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Diet Hacks for Weird Work Hours



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Whoever invented the concept of “breakfast, lunch, and dinner” deserves a hearty handshake from anyone who has ever tried to get their diet under control.

After all, a little structure — be it three squares daily (and maybe a couple snacks), intermittent fasting, or more involved plans such as Beachbody’s 80 Day Obsession Timed Nutrition — goes a long way toward giving us the right foods at the right time to help us reach our goals, whether it’s weight loss, performance, or plain ol’ good health.

Unfortunately, one caveat of this structure is that you keep a fairly normal 9-5 schedule.

When and how much to eat gets confusing quickly if you don’t sleep seven or eight hours at night and stay awake during the day.

This can happen for a few reasons: Typically it’s because you work the night shift, the swing shift, the 24-hour-shift, or some other terrible shift your employer has devised to torture you.

(Another reason for irregular hours is that you’re a vampire. If this is the case, you typically have your diet sorted out, so this article isn’t much use to you.)

But if you’re among the living, we’re come up with a few guidelines to help you figure out how and when to eat when you work weird hours.

But First, Sleep

Before we dig in, though, let’s go slightly off-topic and discuss sleep. It’s important to get seven to eight hours of sleep every night for so many reasons.

Among other benefits, sleep is prime time for muscle recovery and building. It also helps regulate the hunger hormones leptin and ghrelin, both which are important to appetite control.

If seven to eight hours a night can’t happen, at least try to take naps. While nothing truly makes up for a good night’s sleep, a 2008 British study shows naps to be more effective in dealing with afternoon drowsiness than caffeine.

Naps can also ward off fatigue for those forced to stay awake for long hours.

Got it? Cool. Now here are those guidelines:

If you wake up at odd hours but still keep a consistent schedule….

Start your eating day when you wake up. If you crawl out of bed at 6pm, that’s your morning. Eat accordingly.

This is ideal for people who consistently work the night shift. Just like the rest of your life, day becomes night and night becomes day with your diet.

If your schedule shuffles around but you still get eight (or so) hours of sleep daily…

Reset your plan at midnight. In other words, just make sure you get all your meals for each day in within a 24-hour period, starting at 12:01am.

This might mean that some days are breakfast, sleep, lunch, and dinner while others are breakfast, lunch, sleep, and dinner. Just make it work for the day and reboot at midnight.

If you need to stay awake for a prolonged period (18-24 hours)…

You need to be a little more strategic. Here’s a six-step plan.

Eat normally for the first 12 or so hours. Don’t eat for the next four to six hours. Normally, this is part of the time you would be sleeping, so if you can work a short nap in here, great. After that, start eating the next day’s meals. It should be one or two meals. Unless you’re going for a Guinness World Record, you should be done working, so go to sleep! When you wake up, finish the rest of the meals for the day you started before you slept. Make a point of going to bed early this day. The Bottom Line

There’s no one-size-fits-all hack for dealing with unusual working hours. Just like other aspects of your life, you’ll need to improvise and learn as you go, but hopefully, with this set of tips, you should be able to find the right solution for you.

Diet Hacks for Weird Work Hours was originally posted at <a href="" target="_blank" rel="noopener"></a> by Denis Faye, M.S.

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Baking Recipes

Sweet Potato Casserole



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Who doesn’t love sweet potato casserole? It’s the dish we all look forward to as we pull up the driveway on Thanksgiving Day (or any day, really!)

But there’s probably a reason Aunt Mary is keeping that family recipe a tightly held secret.

That’s because when you realize the average candy-coated Sweet Potato Casserole likely contains more than one stick of butter, a hefty amount of heavy whipping cream, and who knows how much refined white sugar, you might think twice before digging in.

(We’re not even going to think about those recipes topped with marshmallows.)

The good news: All of these traditional ingredients aren’t necessary to create an amazing Sweet Potato Casserole.

If you’re looking to wow the crowd, keep it simple. This Sweet Potato Casserole recipe from 21 Day Fix creator Autumn Calabrese and her brother, chef Bobby Calabrese, uses a handful of simple ingredients to create a decadent glaze which perfectly accents this naturally sweet vegetable.

Autumn and Bobby run through this simple and delicious recipe while giving important tips along the way.

For example, did you know a great way to cook sweet potatoes evenly in the oven is to keep your dice as close to the same size as possible?

A bit of fresh ginger can give this recipe that extra flavor boost, but if you have fresh ginger go for it; if not, ginger powder works well, too.

While this is a classic holiday side dish that’s ideal for Thanksgiving, it’s also an awesome meal prep dish that you can make any time of year.

As Autumn points out, this dish “tastes like candy,” so it’s a great way to satisfy your sweet tooth all year long.

This will certainly be the easiest sweet potato casserole you’ll ever make!

To get the recipe and find out the Portion Fix Containers and nutritional information, watch the FIXATE episode on Beachbody On Demand!

Sweet Potato Casserole was originally posted at <a href="" target="_blank" rel="noopener"></a> by Toshi Jones

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Toasted Kale Salad



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Kale is densely nutritious and hugely versatile — so aren’t we all going through two bunches a week?

People may think kale is too tough or chewy, but unlike some of the most hearty greens — collards, I’m looking at you — kale is actually not all that difficult to prepare and doesn’t require a ton of boiling to be palatable.

A light toasting in a heavy skillet will it break down just enough to maintain a bit of crunch. (All the same, I’ve heard home cooks discuss how long one should “massage” their kale before serving it raw — yes, that’s a thing.)

It really just comes down to having a collection of healthy, achievable recipes at the ready to broaden your repertoire and ease the mind.

This Kale Salad is an easy way to incorporate this nutritious leafy green into your healthy meal plan.

For their healthy cooking show FIXATE, 21 Day Fix creator Autumn Calabrese and her brother, chef Bobby Calabrese have put together a hearty kale salad topped with blackened chicken breast and the FIXATE Lemon Dijon dressing.

As a bonus, they’ve got the lowdown on the perfect technique to mastering Bobby’s dry-rubbed Cajun chicken. This oil-free pan sear relies on a layer of Cajun seasoning that almost serves as a crust and beautifully blackens the exterior of the chicken breast.

Because toasting kale is easy, but not entirely obvious, Bobby shares a few tips that help to ensure your Kale Salad doesn’t end up tasting more like kale chips!

This recipe works well as a hearty, satisfying lunch. But also consider it an easy to prepare dinner party salad.

If you’ll be taking on lots of dishes for the holidays and want to add a no-fuss salad that’s sure to impress, this is an ideal choice.

You can easily double or triple this recipe toasting your kale in batches. The tangy Lemon Dijon dressing pairs well with chicken, turkey, or beef and won’t overpower your main dish.

To get the recipe and find out the Portion Fix Containers and nutritional information, watch the FIXATE episode on Beachbody On Demand!

Toasted Kale Salad was originally posted at <a href="" target="_blank" rel="noopener"></a> by Toshi Jones

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Arm Workouts

9 Exercises for Your Best Upper-Body Workout



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If crafting the perfect upper body were simple, we’d all be walking around with rockstar guns, and performing everyday feats of strength (like getting that couch out of the moving truck) would be a nonissue. But push-ups are hard. And pull-ups are even harder. And that can be discouraging when so many upper-body workout routines include both of those moves. Luckily, they’re not the only upper-body exercises you can do to get defined arms and a built back. By incorporating other upper-body exercises into your routine, you can work even more muscle groups to create the best upper-body workout yet.

How do you build upper-body strength?

Push-ups and pull-ups are highly functional exercises to help you build upper-body strength, and they certainly can have their place in any upper-body workout routine. But if you’re not very good at them, there are plenty of other exercises that can help you build strength and size. Even if you’re a fan, you should still round out your routine with a variety of upper-body exercises to keep challenging your body.

Plus, if you want to build muscle definition or size, you can’t discount the value of doing an upper-body workout with dumbbells. Although bodyweight exercises are an excellent way to build muscle, adding weight to your routine allows you to challenge your muscles in new ways.

To build bigger, stronger muscles (upper body or otherwise), here are some things you should keep in mind:

Keep challenging your muscles. You can do this by adding more weight, doing more reps, or reducing rest periods between sets. You don’t need to change a lot every single work out — even minor tweaks can help keep your muscles progressing. Do more sets. Instead of going as hard as you can for just one set, research has found that lifters who performed three to five sets saw more strength gains, muscle endurance, and hypertrophy than those who just did one set per exercise. Eat right. Protein is essential when it comes to building muscle. Make sure you’re eating enough and that you’re eating it at the right time (hint: try after you exercise). Beachbody Performance Recover offers 20 grams of high-quality protein to help your muscles grow and repair after a challenging workout.

Get even more tips on how to build muscle in this guide.

9 of the Best Exercises for Your Next Upper-Body Workout

This list of upper-body exercises will help you build the upper body you’ve always wanted. Plus, you can do them from the comfort of your own home — all you need for this upper-body dumbbell workout are dumbbells (or resistance bands) and a bench or stability ball.

1. Bent-over row

Appears in: The 20’s – Rachel – I Do: Strength
Benefits: “No one can ever do enough rows,” says Tony Gentilcore, C.S.C.S, owner of CORE gym in Boston. By offsetting many of the postural issues associated with sitting hunched over a computer all day, rows can help eliminate back pain and correct your posture, giving your entire body a visual lift, he says.

Stand tall, holding a set of dumbbells at your sides, with your palms facing your body. (You can also use a resistance band: Loop the band around each foot. Hold the left handle in your right hand and the right handle in your left hand so that that the band forms an “X.”) Keeping your back flat, core braced, and knees slightly bent, bend at the waist so that your back is just above parallel with the floor. Your arms should hang toward the floor. Row the dumbbells to the sides of your ribs, squeezing your shoulder blades together at the top of the movement. Pause, then slowly lower your arms back down, and repeat. 2. Arnold press

Appears in: Clean Week – Strength
Benefits: “Arnold Schwarzenegger was smart in the gym, and this exercise remains a weight room favorite after decades,” says Kourtney Thomas, C.S.C.S. Why? Because it hits all three sections of the deltoid muscle at one time: the anterior (front), medial (side), and posterior (rear).

Hold two dumbbells in front of your chest with your palms facing toward your body, keeping your elbows close to your body. This is your starting position. Press the dumbbells up above your head, rotating your palms out so that when you reach the overhead position, they face away from your body. Reverse the motion to lower the dumbbells back down, corkscrewing your hands so your palms end facing your body, and repeat.

Tip: You can perform this exercise seated or standing. “Seated, you’ll be able to press a little more weight,” Thomas says. “Standing, you’ll get more core engagement because you’re being forced to stabilize your entire body throughout the move.”

3. Dumbbell bench press

Appears in: The Master’s Hammer and Chisel – Max Hammer Strength
Benefits: For those who struggle with push-ups, the bench press allows you to train the pecs, triceps, and shoulders in a different way. For push-up masters, the bench press allows you to use more than just your body weight to work these muscles, which is vital to adding significant strength or definition, Gentilcore explains.

Lay with your back on a flat bench, holding a dumbbell in each hand directly above your chest. Raise your arms straight above your chest, palms facing forward. Bend your elbows to lower the dumbbells until your upper arms are parallel with the floor. Pause, then press up and slightly in so that you end with your arms fully extended, and repeat. 4. Pullover

Appears in: The Master’s Hammer and Chisel – Total Body Chisel
Benefits: This move might look simple, but there’s actually a lot going on — specifically when it comes to building your lats and pecs, Thomas says. Bonus: You’ll feel your core fire up with every rep, too.

Lay with your back on a flat bench, holding a set of dumbbells. With your feet planted on the ground and your core engaged, extend your arms to the sky, holding the dumbbells together above your chest. With a slight bend in your elbows, slowly lower your arms overhead until your biceps reach your ears. Slowly bring your arms back to above your chest and repeat.

Tip: You might be tempted to drop the dumbbells overhead by arching the back and lifting the ribs, Thomas says. Avoid this by keeping your core engaged throughout the exercise.

5. Dumbbell rear-delt fly

Appears in: Clean Week – Strength
Benefits: Speaking of the delts, the posterior delt (aka rear delt) is sorely undertrained — this is one reason shoulder injuries are so common. If you only train the section of the delts you can see head-on, you’ll alter the shoulder positioning. This limits certain movements and causes the joint to work inefficiently.

Stand tall, holding a set of dumbbells down at your sides. Keeping your back flat, push your hips back to hinge forward and lower your chest until it is almost parallel with the ground. Allow the weights to hang straight down at arm’s length, palms facing each other. Maintaining a slight bend in your elbows and keeping your back flat, lift the dumbbells to the side by squeezing the shoulder blades together. Stop when the dumbbells are in line with your body. Pause, then slowly lower the dumbbells back to start, and repeat.

Tip: Be careful not to use momentum to help you raise the dumbbells. Perform each rep slowly and with control. Imagine squeezing an orange between your shoulder blades each time you lift the bells.

6. Standing bicep curl

Appears in: SHIFT SHOP – Strength: 25
Benefits: Apart from building the biceps — everyone’s favorite vanity muscle — biceps curls are actually excellent for promoting shoulder stability, Gentilcore says. The trick is to focus on keeping your shoulders stationary with very rep.

Stand tall with your feet shoulder-width apart, holding two dumbbells at your sides, palms facing away from your body. Keeping your back straight and your elbows locked at your sides, slowly curl the weights as close to your shoulders as possible. Slowly lower back to start and repeat.

Tip: Fight the “ego lifting” urge. Choose weights that you can lift by only bending your elbow, not allowing any movement elsewhere in your body. If your shoulders move, elbows flare, or torso leans, or you find yourself bouncing, you need to go down in weights. You can also perform this exercise by holding onto and standing on a resistance band.

7. Skull crusher press

Appears in: INSANITY: The Asylum Vol. 1 – Strength
Benefits: Biceps may get most of the glory when it comes to arm muscles, but the triceps can be equally impressive when you build them up. Not only does this move help you build triceps that will pop, but the press action also activates the shoulders.

Stand holding a single dumbbell with both hands by the weighted ends at shoulder height, with your elbows tucked. Press the weight straight overhead. Without moving your upper arms, lower the weight behind your head. Reverse the movements to return to the starting position, and repeat.

Tip: You might be surprised how light of a weight you need to perform this exercise. Start with lighter weights to maintain proper form, and add weight as you become more experienced with the move.

8. Seated overhead tricep extension

Appears in: Body Beast – Bulk: Arms
Benefits: Round out the tricep exercises with this exercise. It isolates the tricep muscles, making the most out of every rep.

Seated at the end of a bench, hold one end of the dumbbell with both hands behind your head, arms bent at 90 degrees. Keeping your back flat and your elbows tucked, slowly push the weight up, stopping just short of full extension. Pause, and then lower the weight slowly back down, and repeat.

Tip: Keep your torso straight throughout the movement and resist the urge to lean forward. You can also perform this move standing, which will require greater use of your core for added stability.

9. Floor chest fly

Appears in: P90X3 – Incinerator
Benefits: This move targets the chest muscles in ways other exercises like push-ups and bench presses can’t, Thomas says. And you don’t even need a bench — just a set of dumbbells!

Lay with your back on the floor, your knees bent and your feet flat, holding a pair of dumbbells directly over your chest with your palms facing each other. Allow a slight bend in your elbows. Slowly lower the dumbbells out to your sides, creating a wide arc with your arms until your upper arms lightly touch the floor. Pause, then slowly reverse the movement to return to the top, and repeat.

9 Exercises for Your Best Upper-Body Workout was originally posted at <a href="" target="_blank" rel="noopener"></a> by Hannah Rex

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