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BREAK IT DOWN: The Cat-Cow

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Cat–cow is a two-part yoga flow that stretches the front and back of the body while mobilizing the spine. It’s commonly included in yoga classes and in broader fitness sessions, often as part of a warm-up or mobility sequence.

By all appearances, it’s as easy as getting down on hands and knees, arching the back to lower the belly and point head and tailbone to the sky, and then reversing the move to round the back, tucking the chin and pelvis.

But it’s common for people to move quickly and aggressively between the cow (bitilasana) and cat (marjaryasana) poses. Often, limited mobility causes them to flex and extend well only in some segments of their spines. Moving fast and forcing deep flexion and extension can exaggerate these imbalances and lead to neck and lower-back pain.

To avoid these troubles, the first thing to do is slow down. Move through your range of motion painlessly, focusing on finding movement throughout your entire spine. Inhale as you drop your belly and move into cow; exhale as you round your spine for cat. Feel free to practice each pose individually, returning to a tabletop position instead of flowing between cat and cow.

Once you gain comfort flowing with control, explore ways to have fun with cat–cow or further adapt it to your needs. Try adding lateral movement by shifting your hips from side to side with each breath, or try rolling your shoulders back each time you exhale.

Challenge yourself to try to move extra slowly; imagine articulating through the spine vertebra by vertebra.

See what happens if you initiate the movement from your tailbone, especially if you tend to lead with your head and neck.

Practice the move in a chair or other seated position for a more upright variation of the pose.

  1. Start on your hands and knees in an active tabletop position; keep your neck in a neutral position, with your eyes looking down.
  2. Move first into cow: Inhale and lift your tailbone and chest toward the ceiling, as you allow your belly to relax downward. Lift your head to look forward.
  3. Round into cat: Exhale and draw your spine toward the ceiling. Relax the top of your head toward the floor, but don’t force your chin to your chest.
  4. Reverse the motion on an inhale to move back into cow, and repeat the sequence. Stay active through your hands and feet, but take care not to shift your shoulders and hips forward or back by pushing hard into the floor.

WEBEXTRA

Seated Cat–Cow

  • Sit upright on a chair, stool, or bench with your hands in your lap or hanging loosely at your sides, your feet parallel and hip width apart. If your chair has a back, don’t lean into it; sit on the front edge of the seat.
  • Slowly roll the tops of your hips backward, rounding your lower back and allowing your head to tip forward so you are looking down at your lap.
  • Slowly roll the tops of your hips forward, arching your lower back and allowing your head to tip backward so you can look at the ceiling.
  • Repeat the sequence slowly and with control; focus on the breath and quality of movement rather than pushing or forcing your body to stretch. Draw your shoulders downward, away from your ears, while you perform the movement, and focus on the movement in the hip joints.

This article originally appeared as “The Cat-Cow” in the May 2021 issue of Experience Life.

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How to Train for Your First 5K

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If you don’t consider yourself a runner, the prospect of tackling a 5K may seem daunting. But most anyone can do it, and training for this distance is a great way to build solid fitness habits to last a lifetime.

“One of the biggest reasons people stay away from running is that they are somewhat afraid of it,” says Frankie Ruiz, running coach and chief running officer of Life Time’s Miami Marathon. “There’s a certain fear that comes with it because they don’t know enough about it or because they had a bad experience when they were younger.”

The key when beginning a new running routine, he says, is to “focus on time, not distance.” That way, you get to discover your pace and push yourself from there, with leeway to walk as needed — without judgment or pressure to hit a certain mileage goal.

The first step as you get started, says Ruiz, is to honestly acknowledge where you are right now. “One of the biggest mistakes a new or returning runner makes is not recognizing and respecting the true state of their current fitness.”

“We have to assume we are starting from scratch,” he continues. “This means thinking and acting as a beginner even if you are a veteran runner. This is the surest way to stave off injury and ultimately sustain your participation long term.”

Ruiz suggests signing up for a 5K event three months down the road — or at least picking and committing to a date when you’ll run that distance on your own. “When training for a specific event, there is a sense of urgency that is created by an unmovable time­line,” he says, noting that “highlight moments” like races or other events help motivate us as we progress.

“Done right, running can stick with you for the rest of your life and give you so much more life,” he adds. And if there’s any doubt left in your mind, you have permission to “call yourself a runner after that first run.”

Find Your Easy Pace

Running will be more fun if you start slowly. Don’t worry about pace, except to slow down if you feel out of breath. If you’re panting or breathing hard, you’ve gone too long before pulling back; slow down or walk, says Ruiz. (Yes, it’s OK to walk!)

“Go slow — even slower than you think you should be going.”

Running at an easy pace is an important foundational part of training. This refers to low-intensity exertion that helps build aerobic capacity, engages slow-twitch muscle fibers, and helps improve blood flow and oxygenation to the muscles.

Typically it’s an effort level that allows you to have a conversation; if you monitor your heart rate, an easy pace will bring you to about 65 to 75 percent of your max. Combined with training runs at a medium pace (slightly faster) and tempo pace (even faster, but still not a sprint), easy runs will help you progress as a runner.

In addition to your running pace, be mindful of the pace at which you are progressing. Many people push themselves too fast and too hard too soon, says Ruiz. Listen to your body and heed any signals to pull back.

Add Cross-Training

“If you want to enjoy your first 5K — or maybe even set a new record for yourself — I suggest focusing on building leg strength and stamina,” advises Paul Kriegler, RD, LD, CPT, CISSN, a USA track-and-field coach as well as Life Time’s program developer for nutritional products. One of the most efficient and effective ways to accomplish this is quality resistance training.

Kriegler recommends incorporating three strength sessions each week into your workouts. Focus on full-body stabilizing and strengthening moves; be sure to include warm-up mobility movements and cool-down stretches. (For a lower-body workout to complement your running routine, check out “The Workout: Train for the Trail“.)

To balance your running and cross-training workouts, aim to schedule them on different days. Otherwise, perform strength exercises after your hard runs or before your easy runs — and don’t do weight training the day before your speed session or your long run.

Make Time to Recover

Feeling a little tired and slightly sore while training for a 5K is normal. To keep this minimal fatigue from growing into lasting pain or injury, recovery is key.

“Recovery is your chance to repair muscle tissue damaged by resistance training and prepare for the next session,” says Kriegler. “Too often, many people fail to give their bodies either enough recovery time or nourishment to repair.”

Gentle recovery workouts, as well as warm-up mobility and cool-down stretches, help your body recuperate from your last workout and prime you for the next one. (For a restorative workout, see “Back on Track: Restore Your Posture“.)

In addition, Kriegler emphasizes the importance of getting sufficient sleep and consuming an abundance of produce, adequate high-quality protein, essential fats, wholesome carbohydrates, and enough water.

Mind Your Mindset

Running is as much a mental challenge as a physical one, so it’s important to get your head in the game, says Ruiz. That means being honest with yourself about your abilities, meeting yourself where you are each time you lace up, being patient with your progress, and showing yourself some grace.

“Forget where you once were at the height of your fitness, before your break, or as your younger self: Assume you are starting from zero,” he advises. “Focus on simply finishing each workout, not on how fast you’re doing so. Don’t pay too much attention to the speed and level of fitness of other runners. Try to finish every run happy, knowing you could have done more.”

The Plan

The following 5K plan, designed by Frankie Ruiz, is a 12-week program consisting of progressive workouts that combine easy-pace sessions with training techniques like tempo runs, long runs, intervals, striders, and fartleks. (See “Learn the Lingo” further down for definitions of these terms.)

To ease into the program, Ruiz says, start with a walk–run combo for 21 minutes (or walk at a brisk-for-you pace). Build up to doing these sessions five times per week, ignoring the tempo work and long runs noted in the program until you’re ready.

Taking your time to develop your base will serve you down the road. (If you’re new to exercise, consult with your healthcare provider for medical clearance.)

WEEK MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN

1

 

Easy:

• 21 minutes easy pace

• 6 x 20-
second striders

Medium:

• 21 minutes medium pace

• 6 x 20-second striders

 

 

Recovery:

21 minutes easy pace

 

Tempo:

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 5 minutes tempo pace

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 6 x 20-second striders

Recovery:

21 minutes easy pace

 

Long Run:

30 minutes

Rest

2

 

Easy:

• 21 minutes easy pace

• 6 x 20-
second striders

Medium:

• 21 minutes medium pace

• 8 x 20-second striders

Recovery:

21 minutes easypace

 

Tempo:

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 5 minutes tempo pace

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 6 x 20-second striders

Recovery:

21 minutes easy pace

 

Long Run:

• 35 minutes

• 6 x 20-
second striders

 

Rest

3

Easy:

• 25 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 20-
second striders

 

Intervals:

• 10 minutes easy run

• 6 x 400 meters (3-minute jog/rest between repetitions)

• 10 minutes easy run

Recovery:

21 minutes easy pace

Fartlek:

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 2 minutes fast,
1 minute easy

• 8 x 100-meter
striders

Recovery:

21 minutes easy pace

Long Run:

• 35 minutes

• 6 x 20-
second striders

Rest

4

Easy:

• 25 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 20-
second striders

Intervals:

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 2 x 400 meters (3-minute jog/rest between repetitions)

• 2 x 800 meters (5-minute jog/rest between repetitions)

• 4 x 200 meters (3-minute jog/rest between repetitions)

• 10 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

25 minutes easy pace

Fartlek:

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 5 x 2 minutes fast, 1 minute easy

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 100-meter striders

Recovery:

25 minutes easy pace

Long Run:

• 40 minutes

• 6 x 20-
second striders

Rest

5

Easy:

• 25 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 20-
second striders

Intervals:

• 5–10 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 400 meters (3-minute jog/rest between repetitions)

• 5 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

25 minutes easy pace

Long Intervals:

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 3 x 1 mile (rest between repetitions, at least half the time it took to run 1 mile)

• 5 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

25 minutes easy pace

Long Run:

• 45 minutes

• 6 x 20-
second striders

Rest

6

 

Easy:

• 30 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 20-
second striders

Intervals:

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 8–12 x 400 meters (2- to 4-minute jog/rest between repetitions)

• 10 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

25 minutes easy pace

Long Intervals:

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 2 x 1 mile (rest between repetitions, at least half the time it took to run 1 mile)

• 2 x 800 meters (rest between repetitions, at least as long as it took to run 800 meters)

• 5 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

21 minutes easy pace

Long Run:

• 45 minutes

• 6 x 20-
second striders

Rest

7

Easy:

• 35 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 20-
second striders

Intervals:

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 5 x 1,000 meters (4-minute jog/rest between repetitions)

• 10 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

30 minutes easy pace

Tempo:

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 10 minutes tempo pace

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 8 x 20-second striders

Recovery or Rest:

25 minutes easy pace (optional)

Long Run:

• 50 minutes

• 6 x 20-
second striders

Rest

8

Easy:

• 40 minutes easy pace

• 10 x 20-
second striders

Intervals:

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 1 x 1,200 meters (3-minute rest)

• 1 x 1,000 meters (3-minute rest)

• 1 x 800 meters (3-minute rest)

• 2 x 400 meters (2-minute rest between repetitions)

• 2 x 200 meters (2-minute rest between repetitions)

• 10 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

30 minutes easy pace

Tempo:

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 10 minutes tempo pace

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 10 x 20-second striders

Recovery or Rest:

25 minutes easy pace (optional)

Long Run:

• 55 minutes

• 6 x 20-
second striders

Rest

WEBEXTRA

4 More Weeks!

WEEK MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN

9

Easy:

• 35 minutes easy pace

• 10 x 20-second striders

 

Intervals:

•  10–12 x 400 meters (3 minutes rest between repetitions)

• 4 x 200 meters
(2 minutes rest between repetitions)

• 10 minutes easy run

 

Recovery:

25 minutes easy pace

 

Fartlek:

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 12 x 2 minutes tempo pace (2 minutes brisk walk or medium/easy jog between repetitions)

• 10 x 20-second striders

 

Recovery:

25 minutes easy pace

 

Long Run:

• 60 minutes

• 6 x 20-second striders

Rest

10

Easy:

•  45 minutes easy pace

• 12 x 20-second striders

 

Intervals:

• 40 minutes easy pace

• 12 x 20-second striders

Recovery:

30 minutes easy pace

 

Intervals:

• 10 minutes easy pace

• 5 x 1 kilometer (progressively get faster with each rep;

• 3–4 minutes rest between repetitions)

• 10 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

25 minutes easy pace

 

Long Run:

• 65 minutes

• 6 x 20-second striders

Rest

11

Easy:

• 40 minutes easy pace

• 12 x 20-second striders

 

Intervals:

• 1x 1 mile (rest as long as it took you to run)

• 2 x 800 meters (rest 4 minutes between repetitions)

• 2 x 400 meters (rest 4 minutes between repetitions)

• 4 x 200 meters (rest 2 minutes between repetitions)

• 5 minutes easy pace

 

Recovery:

21 minutes easy pace

 

Tempo:

• 5 minutes easy

• 15 minutes tempo pace

• 5 minutes medium pace

• 12 x 20-second Striders

 

Recovery or Rest:

21 minutes easy pace (or no running)

Long Run:

•  70 minutes

• 6 x 20-second striders

Rest

12

Easy:

• 35 minutes easy pace

• 12 x 20-second striders

 

Intervals:

• 20 minutes medium pace

• 4 x 400 meters
(rest/jog 3 minutes between repetitions)

• 5 minutes easy pace

Recovery:

21 minutes easy pace

 

Tempo:

• 5 minutes easy pace

• 5 minutes tempo pace

• 20 minutes easy pace

• 6 x 20-second striders

 

Recovery or Rest:

• 21 minutes very easy pace

• 4 x 100-meter striders (or no running)

 

5K event of your choice Rest and celebrate!

Download the complete 12-Week 5K plan.

Learn the Lingo

Familiarize yourself with these common training terms and techniques to enhance your running experience.

  • Tempo Run: Faster than your easy pace, your tempo pace is just past comfortable, one that you could sustain for up to 40 minutes but is fast enough that you couldn’t hold a conversation.
  • Intervals: Interval training calls for alternating between work and rest for set amounts of time. “Work” is running at a faster-than-usual pace; “rest” is a slower pace to allow you to recover. While work intervals are not all-out sprints, they are nonconversational and difficult to sustain beyond the interval.
  • Long Run: “This is that one element of properly training for a 5K you can’t live without,” says Frankie Ruiz. Once a week, you’ll run a longer-than-usual time (and hence, distance) to build aerobic capacity and confidence. The goal here is to pace yourself by taking a slow and steady pace, and including walking and stretching breaks as needed.
  • Fartlek: A Swedish term for “speed-play,” this type of training session alternates between different speeds throughout your run.
  • Striders: A strider is not an all-out sprint, but pretty close: Take it a “gear or two below all-out speed,” says Ruiz. Lasting about 10 to 20 seconds, striders are a good time to focus on form. Pay attention to your posture, your arm swing, your cadence, and your knee lift. Take at least one minute of recovery after each strider.

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MRE® Protein Shake

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MRE® Protein Shake is a convenient, ready-to-drink shake that delivers quality nutrition and will keep you fueled anytime, anywhere.

You asked for it, and Redcon1 delivered. Their whole-food meal replacement, MRE®, is now available on the go. In the military, M.R.E. stands for Meals Ready to Eat; these meal packs are given to soldiers out in the field for fuel during intense combat situations. At Redcon1, the MRE® product family is built upon that concept. Every product in the line offers you a whole food meal replacement packed full of delicious food choices that will replenish your system when you need it most.

Serious Protein Nutrition

Similar to Redcon1’s best-selling MRE® powders, the MRE® Protein Shake features an ingredient profile of whole-food protein sources, never any whey or lactose, and the rich, delicious flavor profiles consistent with the entire MRE® line. And now with the launch of the new mouth-watering Salted Caramel flavor – joining the delicious Vanilla Milkshake, Blueberry Cobbler, Milk Chocolate and Strawberry Shortcake flavors – the MRE® Protein Shake has all the flavor choices you could want as well as all the real whole-food ingredients to deliver serious and delicious protein nutrition.

MRE® Protein Shakes are your anytime protein source that can easily be consumed on the go, during post-workout for recovery (the shakes contain multiple protein sources, loaded with amino acids) or pre-workout when you need fuel and calories. The MRE® Protein Shake is a convenient, ready-to-drink shake that delivers quality nutrition and will keep you fueled anytime, anywhere.

Protein On the Go

The MRE® Protein Shake is ready to fuel you up, anytime, anywhere:

• Take it on the go when you’re running between activities.

• Sip it in the morning on the way to work.

• Drink it pre- or post-workout when your body needs fuel.

• Use it as a snack between larger meals.

Whatever your needs, this is the ideal shake.

Made From Real Food

Real food is always best, no matter what your physique goals are; any nutritionist worth his salt will tell you that. The researchers at Redcon1 have taken the MRE® Protein Shake to an entirely new level by giving you healthier, real whole food choices to power your workouts and recovery. The MRE® Protein Shake features an ingredient profile consistent with the entire MRE® line: whole food protein sources, never any whey or lactose, and delicious milkshake-like flavors. With 40 grams of protein from real whole food in each shake, it’s never been easier or more convenient to have a nutritious, satisfying meal, no matter your schedule. Key ingredients include:

Whole Food Protein Blend containing beef protein isolate, pea protein, brown rice protein, and egg white protein.

Medium-Chain Triglycerides, a source of fat that the body can efficiently use as a source of energy.

The ingredients give MRE® Protein Shakes an amazing taste, unmatched flavor and the nutrition that gives you sustained energy throughout the day. And like powdered MRE®, the shakes won’t upset your stomach, cause cramping or give you unwanted gas.

MRE® Ready to Drink

• 40 Grams of Protein Per Carton

• No Whey Protein

• Zero Grams of Sugar

• Whole Food Sources

• Milkshake Taste 

For more information, visit redcon1.com

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Strength Training: Total Body vs. Split Workouts

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Following a well-designed, appropriate strength-training program is one of the most transformational things you can do for your body and health. But sometimes, it’s hard to know where to start or channel your focus.

As a result, almost any fitness professional will tell you that one of the most commonly asked questions they get about strength training is, “Should I do total-body workouts or split my routine up?”

The answer is usually “it depends,” as there is a time and a place for both approaches. Let’s dig in.

Defining Total Body vs. Split When it Comes to Exercise

When doing a total-body routine, you’re engaging in a full-body workout that involves most, if not all, of the major muscles in the body from head to toe. Key muscle groups such as the chest, back, shoulders, glutes, quads, and hamstrings are trained in these workouts. If time permits, sometimes smaller muscle groups — such as biceps, triceps, and calves — are included as well.

Splits divide the body into either sections or parts, movement patterns, or specific muscle groups.

An example of a split dividing the body into sections or parts would be an upper-body/lower-body split. This means the body is split into two different parts, in this case the upper and lower halves. On one day you would train only the muscles of the upper body, and then work the muscles of the lower body the other day.

An example of a movement pattern split would be training with upper-body exercises that move in the horizontal direction on one day (think of a seated row, standing chest press, cable fly, etc.). The second day, leg exercises could be trained using hinge or squat movements. On the third day, exercises that move in the vertical direction (overhead shoulder presses, side raises, pulldowns, etc.) would be used.

Lastly, split routines can focus on muscle groups, with an emphasis on one to three muscle groups per session. An example of a muscle group split would be the following:

  • Monday: Chest
  • Tuesday: Back
  • Wednesday: Shoulders
  • Thursday: Legs
  • Friday: Arms

Total-Body Workouts

The Pros:

  • They are great for people who only have two to three days per week that they can train. (This can be a really useful approach during heavy travel times.)
  • They work well for people who don’t have time to do cardio outside of their training sessions.
  • They usually burn more calories than training split workouts do because more and larger muscle groups are trained.
  • They decrease the chance of having muscle imbalances as most, if not all, major muscle groups get trained.
  • They work well for those starting fitness programs as these people don’t need lots of exercises to target each muscle group.

The Cons:

  • There are a number of impacts due to time constraints:
    • They are usually the longest workouts to do because so many muscles are being trained.
    • It’s difficult to increase training volume (total amount of work being done) over time without extending the duration of the workout, which might take too long depending on your schedule.
    • Usually no more than three sets of each movement can be used due to time limitations.
    • A muscle and/or movement pattern that needs special attention (for aesthetics, weakness, or injury) might not get the needed work due to a lack of time.
  • They can increase the potential of overtraining and poor recovery, as lots of work is being done each session. Training the same large muscle groups on consecutive days can have a negative impact on recovery in some people.
  • Some people find these workouts to be boring as most of the exercises are basic.

Bottom line: While total-body workouts might be longer in duration and demand a lot of your body in each session, fewer training days per week are needed. These routines are designed to be more general, hitting larger muscle groups without specific focus areas.

Training Splits

The Pros:

  • Splits allow you to use multiple exercises and do several sets for each muscle group. As a result, people who have more training experience can benefit from them as more time and sets are needed to keep making progress.
  • People who can and want to train more frequently during the week on a consistent basis can gain value from splits, since the workout duration can be shorter than total-body exercises.
  • If certain muscle groups need more individual work, training splits are often needed.
  • You can train on consecutive days with minimal negative impact on recovery due to different muscle groups being trained on different days.
  • These workouts allow additional time for cardio and core work to be done since they often take less time than total-body workouts.

The Cons:

  • People usually have good intentions to do more workouts, but may end up skipping one or two, meaning muscle groups are often missed. There’s a common stereotype that men frequently miss leg days but stay consistent with arm days.
  • Training splits can cause muscle imbalances if some muscles are trained more consistently than others. For example, people often train muscles they can see (such as the chest, shoulders, arms, and quads) more than muscles they cannot see (such as the back, hamstrings, glutes, and calves).
  • The total calorie burn usually isn’t as high as total-body workouts as fewer muscle groups are trained.

Bottom Line: Split routines allow you to hit each muscle group a bit more, but this might allow for some imbalances to develop. Since each workout is shorter, more sessions are required each week to balance out your exercise approach.

Which one is best?

Depending on your goals, experience, and schedule, total-body workouts, splits, and combinations of both might be used in your routine at different times.

When to use total body:

  • You have limited time to train. If you struggle to get to the club more than two to three times per week, it makes sense to use total-body workouts.
  • Your primary goal is fat loss. Total-body workouts can be really effective for this goal as they burn more calories than splits do.
  • You’re a strength training novice. If you’re new to strength training, total-body workouts can be highly effective as they reinforce crucial movement patterns, which are important for your nerves and muscles to get used to as you advance in your fitness. Plus, those newer to strength training don’t need as much training volume initially.

When to use training splits:

  • You have no trouble working out four or more times per week. Since multiple weekly sessions are needed to hit all body parts, frequent sessions are a must.
  • Your primary goal is muscle gain or strength. Building muscle and increasing strength demand and require more training volume, meaning there needs to be a high number of exercises per muscle group and a high number of sets of each exercise performed.
  • You have experience with strength training. If you’ve been lifting consistently for more than two years, larger volume is needed to see continued progress and results.

How to Use Both Approaches

One opportunity that is often missed by many fitness enthusiasts is that they think they can only do one approach or the other. However, there is no reason why both can’t be used if needed.

Here are 12 different examples of various ways you can use total-body workouts, training splits, or a combination of both over the course of a week.

Workout Option Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
2X/Week Total Body Total Body Total Body
3X/Week Total Body Total Body Total Body Total Body
*3-Day Training Split Upper Body Lower Body Upper Body
**3-Day Training Split Upper Body (Vertical) Lower Body Lower Body (Horizontal)
***3-Day Training Split Back and Biceps Legs Chest, Shoulders, and Triceps
*4-Day Training Split Lower Body Upper Body Lower Body Upper Body
**4-Day Training Split Lower Body (Hinge) Upper Body (Vertical) Lower Body (Squat) Upper Body (Horizontal)
***4-Day Training Split Chest and Triceps Back Legs Shoulders and Biceps
***5-Day Training Split Chest Back Shoulders Legs Arms
3-Day Hybrid Upper Body Lower Body Total Body
4-Day Hybrid Upper Body Lower Body Total Body Total Body
4-Day Hybrid Upper Body (Vertical) Lower Body Upper Body (Horizontal) Total Body
*Represents a Body Section or Part Training Split

**Represents a Movement Pattern Training Split

***Represents a Muscle Group Training Split

Cycling through each approach in eight- to 12-week blocks is often what’s needed at different stages in your exercise journey. No matter which path you choose, know that consistent strength training is worth your time and effort in the long run — for your health, metabolism, and more. Use the guidelines above to help shape your approach so that it’s effective, enjoyable, and designed to drive the results that are most meaningful to you.

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