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Steer Clear of Overtraining in Your Workouts

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Overtraining is something that is commonly experienced in the fitness world yet frequently not recognized. What exactly is overtraining? It happens when the volume or intensity of exercise goes beyond your capacity to recover. Progress is no longer seen, and as time goes on, individuals who are overtraining tend to lose strength and become weaker. This is something that by definition everyone would want to avoid, but it’s easier said than done!

A lot of exercise happens to be a mindset. We’ve all been there: “I’ll just go for a run since I ate a whole pizza last night,” or “I’ll grab a second workout today so I can pig out on dinner.” However, maybe these things are pushing you over the edge into the overtraining zone, a place that you really don’t want to be.

Let’s take a look at five signs that you could be overtraining, and then five potential solutions.

Five Signs of Overtraining Repeated injury: Do you have an injury that heals and then comes right back again? One sign of potential overtraining is having repeated injuries pop up. Because you are not allowing proper recovery between training sessions, the injury will never fully heal and keep coming back. Exhaustion: Do you feel like you just can’t quite seem to get enough rest between training sessions? When an individual is overtraining, the work capacity being done is greater than the recovery time allotted. If you feel your body is not quite ready for the next workout, consider taking a rest. Lack of progression: Are you stuck in your workouts and not seeing any gains even with the greater work capacity? If you are overtraining, you will begin to see a lack of progression in strength and training gains. The workout plateau could be caused by other factors, but consider taking a look at your training if you are lacking in progression. Nagging injury: Do you have a nagging injury that won’t heal? If you have an injury that you cannot recover from and it refuses to go away, you might be training too much. Taking a break will allow your body to recover from those nagging injuries. Persistent muscle soreness: Are you constantly sore after workouts and never feel “normal”? A classic sign of overtraining is constant muscle soreness that will not go away. The lactic acid buildup in your body doesn’t have time to flush out of the muscles when the training regimen is too high.

If you are struggling with any of the overtraining signs, consider one of the following solutions.

Five Solutions for Overtraining Take a break. This tends to be the hardest one because of the challenging mindset, but you will do your body a huge favor if you take some time off. Maybe it’s a week or two weeks, but allow yourself enough time off to fully recover and see the gains that come from it. Reduce volume. One way to break overtraining issues is to reduce the amount that you are working out. You can reduce length or frequency of workouts during the week. Either way, cut down on the volume and see how you feel. Rethink your training plan. You may need to rethink the training plan that you currently have. Maybe you need to change up days or space workouts apart from what you currently have going. Take a look and make adjustments where necessary. Try a massage. Sometimes a deep-tissue massage will help to push out some buildup within your muscles. Take a day and schedule a massage in place of your training session and see if that helps. Reevaluate your goals. While no one wants to reduce a goal they originally set, sometimes if your body cannot take the load you are putting it under, you may need to make a change. This doesn’t mean that you need to reduce your goals; maybe just making small modifications would be acceptable.

This blog was written by Amanda Bireline, Fitness Center Manager. To read more about the NIFS bloggers, click here.

Exercise at Home

10 Moves That Feel Amazing for Tech Neck

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Spending hours every day looking down at your phone and laptop might get you caught up on work and social media, but it can be so tough on your neck and shoulders that it's prompted the rise of a new term: Tech neck.

The phrase describes that slight forward tilt to your head that becomes problematic when you're in that position for too long, according to Carol Mack, DPT, CSCS, a physical therapist and strength coach at CLE Sports PT & Performance in Cleveland. The neck muscles lengthen in the back, creating strain, while shortening in the front, causing your shoulders to round, creating a hunch or “lump” in the area where the top of the back meets the neck.

“That position, in particular, can cause decreased shoulder and neck mobility, sometimes to a significant degree,” she tells SELF. “At some point, range of motion can become limited, to the point where dynamic movement is challenging.”

If that happens, even a beneficial activity like strength training can exacerbate the issue, she adds, because the smaller range of motion will keep your shoulders rounded and your neck jutting forward. If you're doing work targeting muscles on the frontside of the body, like your chest or pectoral muscles, you could be worsening the strain on the upper back, neck, and shoulders.

Plus, no matter what your activity, you'll likely experience pain along with the stiffness and decreased mobility. In a 2019 study published in PLoS One, researchers found a strong association between time spent on a smartphone and duration and severity of neck pain. There can be a ripple effect as well, including more tension in the upper back, numbness in the hands, recurring headaches, and rotator cuff tendonitis, according to Mack.

One long-term fix is to change your positioning so your computer is at eye level, she suggests, and to be sure to take breaks frequently so you're not stuck in the same position for an extended period of time. As for devices like tablets and cell phones that you tend to hold in your lap or at your chest, ideally the best option is to sit in a chair or on a couch where you can rest your head on the back of it, and bring your phone or tablet up to eye level. If that's not feasible (or if you find yourself reverting to your initial, head-down position), pencil in regular move breaks to make sure you're changing up your position.

Those are all ways to prevent tech neck, but what about if it's already reared up? The good news is, there are some things you can do to alleviate the tightness and discomfort.

And stretching is a major one—the right stretches can feel amazing for easing that tension. Tech neck stretches can help in a variety of ways, such as by gently lengthening the muscles in the front of the neck or providing some relief for overstretched muscles in the back of the neck. Because your neck muscles also attach to those in your shoulders, chest, and upper back, stretching those related muscles can be beneficial, too.

Here are 10 stretches Mack suggests for getting back into alignment. Pick three to four, and start out by holding each for 30 seconds, though you can try to hold them for up to a minute for additional relief. (Of course, if you're experiencing shooting pain, have severe headaches you think are related to neck tension, or stretches like these aren't helping, be sure to see a physical therapist or doctor.)

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Yoga Exercises For Beginners

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The following article will discuss the different poses that beginners can practice. These include Cow Face, Fish Pose, and Plank Pose. You will also learn how to breathe through challenging poses like Utkatasana. These poses are perfect for beginners to practice opening the body and breathing through challenging positions. For more information, check out the article. And stay tuned for more articles about yoga poses for beginners! Enjoy! Here's a quick overview of the most popular poses.

Table of Contents

The following article will discuss the different poses that beginners can practice. These include Cow Face, Fish Pose, and Plank Pose. You will also learn how to breathe through challenging poses like Utkatasana. These poses are perfect for beginners to practice opening the body and breathing through challenging positions. For more information, check out the article. And stay tuned for more articles about yoga poses for beginners! Enjoy! Here's a quick overview of the most popular poses.

Fish Pose

If you have limited neck strength or mobility, you may need a head support while in the Fish Pose. A thick, folded blanket placed under the head will help keep it from collapsing and straining. Another option for a beginner is to keep the head upright and stretch the neck, not the shoulders. You can also modify the pose by lowering the chest and lifting the arms away from the body. Then, slowly lower the head.

Cow Face

If you have not tried Cow Face Yoga Exercises yet, now is a good time to do so. This pose stretches the shoulders and stimulates good posture. Especially good for people who spend much time sitting in front of a computer, Cow Face is a great way to release tension in your shoulders, upper back, and middle back. To begin this yoga exercise, start by bending your elbows. Next, extend your right arm and left elbow over your head. Your hands should be clasped together in between your shoulder blades.

Plank Pose

If you're looking for an easy yoga exercise for beginners, plank pose might be the right one for you. This pose works the entire body, not just your legs. As with any yoga exercise, plank pose requires a lot of focus and positive self-talk in order to succeed. In fact, a man who held the world record for the longest time in plank is Daniel Scali. He held the pose for nine hours, thirty minutes and one second in 2021. Even a minute in a plank can be hard, but the longer you hold it the more likely you are to become strong and fitter.

Utkatasana

This backbend poses gently stretches the spine and arms while the torso remains stable. It is a good yoga exercise for beginners because it requires a shift in weight from front to back. You also have to lift your chin and lengthen your ribcage, which are essential to achieve the correct alignment. Try this yoga exercise for beginners and you'll soon feel the benefits! Once you have mastered this yoga exercise, you can advance to more challenging versions of this classic pose.

Trikonasana

One of the most basic poses in yoga is the trikonasana. It can be a good warm-up exercise. It strengthens the chest, hips, and lower back. It can also relieve lower back pain. You should hold this posture for twenty to twenty-five seconds before releasing. This yoga exercise is beneficial for beginners and experienced yoga practitioners alike. To learn how to perform this pose, follow these instructions.

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8 Reasons to Try Indoor Rowing

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As outdoor workouts become relegated to the weekend and your body requires a reprieve from repeated long rides or runs, a fresh training method could become a welcome change to your training schedule. Enter: indoor rowing.

As the heir apparent to the reigning king of group fitness classes, indoor cycling, indoor rowing is poised to become the country’s newest workout obsession, as rowing studios continue to pop up throughout the country.

If you’re looking to supplement your training regime, consider this full-body workout. Here are eight reasons you should try indoor rowing:

1. It Burns a High Amount of Calories

Harvard Medical School states that a 155-pound person rowing at a vigorous pace can burn more than 600 calories per hour. This is on par with mountain and BMX biking.

2. Rowing Removes Muscular Failings

“Endurance runners and cyclists tend to have many muscular deficiencies that lead to repetitive stress injuries,” says Richard Butler, a UCanRow2 Concept2 indoor rowing coach at Mecka Fitness in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He believes rowing can offset this propensity. “When we row, we use more than 86% of our muscles. [It’s] tough to have deficient muscles using that many muscles.”

3. Rowing Circumvents Compensation

“While running and cycling, it is also very easy to become quad-dominant (overusing your anterior muscles),” says Dustin Hogue, interval studio director of Studio Three in Chicago. “Rowing counteracts this by engaging the posterior muscles of your body: the hamstrings, glutes and back. This helps avoid compensations.”

4. It Burns Fat

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In a study published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, which compared fat oxidation in rowing to cycling across a range of variables — including exercise intensity, mode and recruited muscle mass — rowing beat out cycling. This was specifically due to the greater recruitment of larger muscle mass on the ergometer.

5. It’s a Two-For-One Workout

Rowing works both the upper and lower extremities in synchronicity. “It’s one of the true full-body workouts,” says Butler. He says when done properly, in one continuous movement, athletes use their back, arms, legs and core.

READ MORE > SPINNING 101 AND THE ANATOMY OF A SPIN BIKE [INFOGRAPHIC]

6. There’s a Meditative Component

According to UCanRow2, an organization with a mission to bring rowing to people across the U.S., rowing indoors keeps the mind centered and helps relieve stress as you get into a rhythm with each stroke.  

7. Classes Teach You Proper Technique

Most people have either never rowed or row with incorrect, gawky posture — curtailing rowing’s proper returns. But participating in indoor rowing classes diminishes the inelegance and instructors help you perfect your position. “That awkward feeling of not knowing how to do a move is minimized,” says Butler.

8. It Decreases the Risk of Injuries

For those who recently suffered an injury and feel a little apprehensive getting back into high-impact sports (like running), but feel ready to get back into cardiovascular shape, rowing is a favorable alternative. “Running causes a great deal of stress on the leg joints, so rowing is perfect for avoiding injury while endurance training,” says Butler.

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As with any group fitness class, rowing classes vary by studio and instructor. “A typical rowing class at Studio Three pairs bursts of short, anaerobic exercises, with active recovery periods and weighted resistance training,” says Hogue. “Athletes perform a series, or distance or timed pushes on the rower along with multi-joint strength movements off of the rower.” At ROWFit by Mecka Fitness, Butler teaches authentic, crew rowing techniques to increase endurance and train all major muscles. At the popular Row House NYC in New York City instructors encourage participants to row in sync with each other, simulating a real crew team.  

Whatever class you choose, all indoor rowing classes focus on providing low-impact, high-energy workouts, helping you elevate your heart rate and building strength as a complement to any endurance training regime.    

If you’re interested in indoor rowing, you can find a certified instructor at UCanRow2 and even become certified yourself.  

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